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When Aince Aprile Has Fairly Come
by [?]


When aince Aprile has fairly come,
An’ birds may bigg in winter’s lum,
An’ pleisure’s spreid for a’ and some
O’ whatna state,
Love, wi’ her auld recruitin’ drum,
Than taks the gate.

The heart plays dunt wi’ main an’ micht;
The lasses’ een are a’ sae bricht,
Their dresses are sae braw an’ ticht,
The bonny birdies!-
Puir winter virtue at the sicht
Gangs heels ower hurdies.

An’ aye as love frae land to land
Tirls the drum wi’ eident hand,
A’ men collect at her command,
Toun-bred or land’art,
An’ follow in a denty band
Her gaucy standart.

An’ I, wha sang o’ rain an’ snaw,
An’ weary winter weel awa’,
Noo busk me in a jacket braw,
An’ tak my place
I’ the ram-stam, harum-scarum raw,
Wi’ smilin’ face.

FOOTNOTE:
TABLE OF COMMON SCOTTISH VOWEL SOUNDS

ae }
ae } = open A as in rare.

a’ }
au } = AW as in law
aw }

ea = open E as in mere, but this with exceptions, as
heather = heather, wean=wain, lear=lair.

ee }
ei } = open E as in mere.
ie }

oa = open O as in more.
ou = doubled O as in poor.
ow = OW as in bower.
u = doubled O as in poor.
ui or u-umlaut before R = (say roughly) open A as in
rare.
ui or u-umlaut before any other consonant = (say roughly)
close I as in grin.
y = open I as in kite.
i = pretty nearly what you please, much as in English,
Heaven guide the reader through that labyrinth! But in Scots
it dodges usually from the short I, as in grin, to the open E,
as in mere. Find the blind, I may remark, are prounced to
rhyme with the preterite of grin.