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Middle-Age Enthusiasms
by [?]


To M. H.

We passed where flag and flower
Signalled a jocund throng;
We said: “Go to, the hour
Is apt!”–and joined the song;
And, kindling, laughed at life and care,
Although we knew no laugh lay there.

We walked where shy birds stood
Watching us, wonder-dumb;
Their friendship met our mood;
We cried: “We’ll often come:
We’ll come morn, noon, eve, everywhen!”
– We doubted we should come again.

We joyed to see strange sheens
Leap from quaint leaves in shade;
A secret light of greens
They’d for their pleasure made.
We said: “We’ll set such sorts as these!”
– We knew with night the wish would cease.

“So sweet the place,” we said,
“Its tacit tales so dear,
Our thoughts, when breath has sped,
Will meet and mingle here!” . . .
“Words!” mused we. “Passed the mortal door,
Our thoughts will reach this nook no more.”