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Julot The Apache
by [?]


You’ve heard of Julot the apache, and Gigolette, his mome. . . .
Montmartre was their hunting-ground, but Belville was their home.
A little chap just like a boy, with smudgy black mustache,–
Yet there was nothing juvenile in Julot the apache.
From head to heel as tough as steel, as nimble as a cat,
With every trick of twist and kick, a master of savate.
And Gigolette was tall and fair, as stupid as a cow,
With three combs in the greasy hair she banged upon her brow.
You’d see her on the Place Pigalle on any afternoon,
A primitive and strapping wench as brazen as the moon.
And yet there is a tale that’s told of Clichy after dark,
And two gendarmes who swung their arms with Julot for a mark.
And oh, but they’d have got him too; they banged and blazed away,
When like a flash a woman leapt between them and their prey.
She took the medicine meant for him; she came down with a crash . . .
“Quick now, and make your get-away, O Julot the apache !” . . .
But no! He turned, ran swiftly back, his arms around her met;
They nabbed him sobbing like a kid, and kissing Gigolette.

Now I’m a reckless painter chap who loves a jamboree,
And one night in Cyrano’s bar I got upon a spree;
And there were trollops all about, and crooks of every kind,
But though the place was reeling round I didn’t seem to mind.
Till down I sank, and all was blank when in the bleary dawn
I woke up in my studio to find–my money gone;
Three hundred francs I’d scraped and squeezed to pay my quarter’s rent.
“Some one has pinched my wad,” I wailed; “it never has been spent.”
And as I racked my brains to seek how I could raise some more,
Before my cruel landlord kicked me cowering from the door:
A knock . . . “Come in,” I gruffly groaned; I did not raise my head,
Then lo! I heard a husky voice, a swift and silky tread:
“You got so blind, last night, mon vieux, I collared all your cash–
Three hundred francs. . . . There! Nom de Dieu,” said Julot the apache.

And that was how I came to know Julot and Gigolette,
And we would talk and drink a bock, and smoke a cigarette.
And I would meditate upon the artistry of crime,
And he would tell of cracking cribs and cops and doing time;
Or else when he was flush of funds he’d carelessly explain
He’d biffed some bloated bourgeois on the border of the Seine.
So gentle and polite he was, just like a man of peace,
And not a desperado and the terror of the police.

Now one day in a bistro that’s behind the Place Vendome
I came on Julot the apache, and Gigolette his mome.
And as they looked so very grave, says I to them, says I,
“Come on and have a little glass, it’s good to rinse the eye.
You both look mighty serious; you’ve something on the heart.”
“Ah, yes,” said Julot the apache, “we’ve something to impart.
When such things come to folks like us, it isn’t very gay . . .
It’s Gigolette–she tells me that a gosse is on the way.”
Then Gigolette, she looked at me with eyes like stones of gall:
“If we were honest folks,” said she, “I wouldn’t mind at all.
But then . . . you know the life we lead; well, anyway I mean
(That is, providing it’s a girl) to call her Angeline.”
“Cheer up,” said I; “it’s all in life. There’s gold within the dross.
Come on, we’ll drink another verre to Angeline the gosse.”